IDENTIFICATION OF VIRULENT NEWCASTLE DISEASE VIRUSES IN BROILERS IN KAFRELSHEIKH GOVERNORATE THROUGH THE YEAR 2017

Abd Ellwahed El-Shawadfi, Fares El-Khyat, AbdEl-Galil El-Gohary

Abstract


The aim of the present study was to identify virulent Newcastle disease viruses (NDVs) circulating in broilers in Kafrelsheikh Governorate during the year 2017. Recognition of the virulent NDV strains to identify their degree of identity with the currently used vaccines against Newcastle disease in order to predict degree of protective immunity that can be offered by traditionally vaccines used against these virulent NDVs. The obtained results revealed presence of 11 samples positive for NDV as detected by inoculation into chick embryo via allantoic cavity route followed by HA and HI test. Furthermore, by using specific primers for F region to detect genotype VII, only 4 out of the positive 11 samples belonged to class II genotype VII sub genotype d were detected.

Key words: Newcastle disease virus; genotype VII; broilers; Egypt


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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.26873/SVR-757-2019

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